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Governance Themes Information Database Organisation Database Training and Events
Governance Themes Information Database Organisation Database Training and Events

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Governance Themes Information Database Organisation Database Training and Events
Governance Themes Information Database Organisation Database Training and Events

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Incentives for service delivery

This page forms part of the Governance Theme section on 'service delivery'. DFID's policy to guarantee the equitable and universal provision of effective basic services includes a focus on the incentives for service delivery. This page of key texts explores the issues of downwards accountability to clients and affordable public services.

Page contents

Downwards accountability to clients

Affordable public services

General
Civic organisations
Voice
Parliament

Key texts: Downwards accountability to clients

General

Girishankar, N. 1999, Reforming Institutions for Service Delivery: A Framework for Development Assistance with an Application to the Health, Nutrition and Population Portfolio, ' World Bank Policy Research Working Paper no. 2039, Operations Evaluation Department, Poverty Reduction and Economic Management Network, The World Bank, Washington, D.C.
This World Bank study argues that the institutional capability of the state has taken on greater significance with far-reaching implications for development policy and public sector reform. If institutions are the rules of the game that govern production and exchange, the state plays a major role in establishing these rules. Furthermore, it has the monopoly power on legitimate use to enforce them.
Full document available online

World Bank 1993, World Development Report 1993: Investing in Health, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
This World Development Report examines the interplay between human health, health policy and economic development. The report takes a global perspective, distinguishing between high, medium and low-income countries. The recommendations made in the report contribute to the goal of attainment for all people of a level of health that will permit them to lead a socially and economically productive life (1978 Alma-Ata conference).
Full document available online

World Bank 2001, Filipino Report Card on Pro-poor Services, The World Bank, Washington, D.C.
This Report Card, produced by the World Bank in collaboration with a Filipino survey research organisation, Social Weather Stations, seeks to complement expert analyses by providing client-led feedback concerning the performance of public services. Five sectors are considered (health care, elementary education, water supply, housing and subsidised rice distribution) and the governments key poverty reduction programme, Lingap para sa Mahihirap (Caring for the Poor).
Full document available online

Crook, R. and Manor, J. 1998, 'Conclusion Chapter' (pp. 271-304) in Democracy and Decentralisation in South Asia and West Africa: Participation, Accountability and Performance, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge.
Recent empirical research from Manor and Crook examines whether governmental performance actually improves with decentralisation and participation by systematically comparing four countries, Ghana, Cote d'Ivoire, Bangladesh and Karnataka (India).
Full document available through: BLDS document delivery service. Please access full summary and then click on the link for "BLDS Document Delivery Service".

Civic organisations

Robinson, M. and White, G. 1998, 'Chapter 13: Civil Society and Social Provision: The Role of Civic Organisations' in Minogue, M., Polidano, C. and Hulme, D. 1998, Beyond the New Public Management: Changing Ideas and Practices in Governance in the series 'New Horizons in Public Policy', Cheltenham, Edward Elgar.
A paper by Mark Robinson and Gordon White from the Institute of Development Studies at Sussex University assesses the distinctive capacity and role of the civic sector in service provisioning in light of actual experience. It examines two types of civic organisations: formal, such as non-governmental, non-profit organisations (NGOs), churches, labour unions, farmers' organisations, philanthropic business and professional associations and informal, such as user groups of various sorts as well as parent-teacher committees.
Full document available through: BLDS document delivery service. Please access full summary and then click on the link for "BLDS Document Delivery Service".

Voice

Goetz, A.M. and Gaventa, J. et al. 2000, 'Bringing citizen voice and client focus into service delivery,' IDS Working Paper no. 138, Institute of Development Studies, Brighton.
This study examines current public sector reforms across the world in both developed and developing countries. It assesses their attempts to focus more on the needs of users.
Full document available online

Parliament

Corder, H., Jagwanth, S. and Soltau, F. 1999 Report on Parliamentary Oversight and Accountability, Faculty of Law, University of Cape Town.
A report by the University of Cape Town explores issues of accountability in terms of the constitutional framework within which oversight activity takes place in the South African Parliament.
Full document available online

Key texts: Affordable public services

Van Adams, A., Harnett, T. 1996 Cost Sharing in the Social Sectors of Sub- Saharan Africa: Impact on the Poor, World Bank Discussion Paper No. 338, African Technical Department Series.
This paper explores the realities of cost sharing in the health and education sectors in SSA, in terms government policy on financing key social services. It recommends that user fees be implemented for services consumed by the non-poor to provide revenue for primary services and other programmes consumed by the poor.
Full document available online

Adamolekun, L et al. 2001, 'Africa Needs Professional Bureaucracy: A Case for Francophone Africa,' The Regional Workshop on Civil Service Reform, January 1996.
In the newly independent Africa, the 'Africanization' of administrative systems disproportionately enlarged the size of the civil service, and more so in the francophone countries. The economic crisis of the 1980s forced them to look for fiscal stabilisation, which dictated cutting down government expenditure. These measures, however, had limited impact. The Regional Workshop on Civil Service Reform made some headway in identifying what went wrong and caused inefficiency and corrupt governments in those countries.
Full document available online

Saltman, R.B. and Von Otter, C. (eds) 1995, Implementing Planned Markets in Health Care: Balancing Social and Economic Responsibility, Open University Press, Buckingham.
The introductory chapter of 'Implementing Planned Markets in Health Care' considers the implications of reform and the debates surrounding change in health care markets. Looking at industrialised and primarily North European countries, most case study evidence reflects the relatively constrained conditions of government commitments to universal access and strong regulatory pressures.
Full document available through: BLDS document delivery service. Please access full summary and then click on the link for "BLDS Document Delivery Service".

World Bank 2001, Filipino Report Card on Pro-poor Services, World Bank, Washington, D.C.
This Report Card, produced by the World Bank in collaboration with a Filipino survey research organisation, Social Weather Stations, seeks to complement expert analyses by providing client-led feedback concerning the performance of public services. Five sectors are considered (health care, elementary education, water supply, housing and subsidised rice distribution) and the governments key poverty reduction programme, Lingap para sa Mahihirap (Caring for the Poor).
Full document available online

World Bank 1993, World Development Report 1993: Investing in Health, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
This World Development Report examines the interplay between human health, health policy and economic development. The report takes a global perspective, distinguishing between high, medium and low-income countries. The recommendations made in the report contribute to the goal of attainment for all people of a level of health that will permit them to lead a socially and economically productive life (1978 Alma-Ata conference).
Full document available online

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