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Governance Themes Information Database Organisation Database Training and Events
Governance Themes Information Database Organisation Database Training and Events

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Governance Themes Information Database Organisation Database Training and Events
Governance Themes Information Database Organisation Database Training and Events

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Sectors

This page forms part of the Governance Theme section on 'service delivery'. The following series of key texts explores the equitable and universal provision of services in three sectors: health, education, and water supply and sanitation.

Page contents

Health

Water supply and sanitation

Education

Key texts: Health

Department for International Development 2000, Better Health for Poor People: Strategies for Achieving the International Development Targets, DFID, London.
DFID has prepared a paper recommending strategies for reaching the international development targets. Achievement depends on: developing a country lead, a local community lead and international support for reforms.
Full document available online

Aljunid, S. 1995, 'The role of private medical practitioners and their interactions with public health services in Asian countries,' Health Policy and Planning, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 333-49.
This Health Policy and Planning Journal article provides a literature review of papers that consider the role of the private sector across a large number of developing countries, from India, to Mexico, to Papua New Guinea, but focussing mainly on the East Asian region. The significance of private health care in Asian countries, factors influencing utilisation of health services, and the interaction between public and private providers across countries are included.
Full document available through: the BLDS document delivery service. Please access full summary and then click on the link for "BLDS Document Delivery Service".

Bennett, S. and Mills, A. 1998, 'Government capacity to contract: health sector experience and lessons,' Public Administration and Development, vol. 18, no. 4, pp. 307-326.
A paper from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK, uses a number of case studies to explore questions of contracting in the context of developing countries.
Full document available through: BLDS document delivery service. Please access full summary and then click on the link for "BLDS Document Delivery Service".

Gilson, L., Sen, P.D., Mohammed, S. and Mujinja, P. 1994, 'The potential of health sector non-governmental organizations - policy options,' Health Policy and Planning, vol. 9, no. 1, pp. 14-24.
This article, from the journal Health Policy and Planning, throws light on current practices and future opportunities, in order to inform the process of policy development with respect to the incorporation of NGOs within health systems. Current practice is characterised by a key perceived strength of NGOs, that is, like health professionals, they are primarily motivated by humanitarian concern. However, some NGOs pursue profits and this can affect their response to circumstances.
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Mills, A. et al. 2000, The Challenges of Health Sector Reforms: What Must Governments Do? Palgrave, Basingstoke.
Health sector reform has been described as 'sustained, purposeful change to improve the efficiency, equity and effectiveness of the health sector'. There is no universal package of health care reforms, but the most widespread elements include restructuring public sector organisations, linking reward to performance, encouraging plurality and competition, funding through non-tax revenue, and increasing the role of the consumer in the health system.
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Saltman, R.B. and Von Otter, C. (eds) 1995, Implementing Planned Markets in Health Care: Balancing Social and Economic Responsibility, Open University Press, Buckingham.
The introductory chapter of 'Implementing Planned Markets in Health Care' considers the implications of reform and the debates surrounding change in health care markets. Looking at industrialised and primarily North European countries, most case study evidence reflects the relatively constrained conditions of government commitments to universal access and strong regulatory pressures.
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World Bank 1993, World Development Report 1993: Investing in Health, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
This World Development Report examines the interplay between human health, health policy and economic development. The report takes a global perspective, distinguishing between high, medium and low-income countries. The recommendations made in the report contribute to the goal of attainment for all people of a level of health that will permit them to lead a socially and economically productive life (1978 Alma-Ata conference).
Full document available online

World Bank 2001, 'Governance in the Health Sector - What Do We Really Mean?,' HPN Flash Issue 41, World Bank, Washington D.C.
An electronic newsletter (HNP Flash) produced by the World Bank Human Development Network summarises recent findings and events concerning health, nutrition and population.
Full document available online

Mills, A. 1994, 'Decentralisation and accountability in the health sector from an international perspective: what are the choices?', Public Administration and Development, vol. 14, pp.281-292.
An article by Anne Mills looks at the vast range of possibilities for decentralisation policies and their impact on accountability, considering to what and whom authority is decentralised and how responsibilities are balanced between different levels.
Full document available through: BLDS document delivery service. Please access full summary and then click on the link for "BLDS Document Delivery Service".

Key texts: Water supply and sanitation

Department for International Development 2000, 'Strategies for Achieving the International Development Targets: Addressing the Water Crisis - Healthier and More Productive Lives for Poor People,' consultation paper, Department for International Development, London.
At present, the poor are still the most susceptible to changes in water resource availability and are least able to adjust their livelihoods in order to deal with change. Addressing the uncertainties the poor face over access to clean and safe water is an essential part of helping them achieve long-term livelihood sustainability. A paper from DFID explores this area of debate.
Full document available by email. Please contact

Department for International Development 1999, DFID Guidance Manual on Water Supply and Sanitation Programmes, WELL Resource Centre, Loughborough University, UK.
The primary purpose of this DFID manual is to set out the principles, procedures and practices that should guide decisions on the choice, design and management of appropriate Water and Sanitation Services (WS&S) projects. Because the effectiveness and sustainability of WS&S projects depends not only on technology choice, but also (critically on user involvement) the right gender approaches, innovative community-based financing and the promotion of behavioural change, the guidance includes discussion of social, financial and institutional aspects as well as engineering and health concerns.
Full document available online

Webster, M. and Sansom, K.,'Public Private Partnership and the Poor: An Initial Review WELL Study,' Task No 164.
New research by the Well Study group at London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine and Loughborough University looks at the issues involved in Public Private Partnerships (PPPs). It finds that there is little documented evidence about the impact of PPPs on the poor. Although there are a number of studies that allude to the possible problems, they do not offer guidance on how to address them. In general, when PPP arrangements are more complex, more sophisticated methods are needed to guard against the risks involved in providing water and sanitation. The extent and the nature of these risks are, as yet, unclear.
Full document available online

Key texts: Education

Department for International Development 2001, The Challenge of Universal Primary Education - Strategies for Achieving the International Development Targets, DFID, London.
This DFID paper outlines the difficulties and challenges that developing countries face to achieve universal primary education (UPE) targets, while suggesting strategies and priorities for governments and the international community. All regions are covered, from Sub-Saharan Africa to south-west Asia and Latin America.
Full document available online

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